Rude Girl Mag

'Cause we're tired of being left out
rudegirlmag.wordpress.com

1,324 notes

Please Excuse Davontaye, He Suffers From Povertenza

daniellemertina:

That’s what I’m saying. If povertenza can’t be a thing (when there’s actually social research that backs up how poverty can negatively impact socializaion and self-development) then affluenza DEFINITELY shouldn’t be a thing. 

But even so a rich black person could have NEVER gotten away with what Couch did. So it’s about class AND race. 

(Source: padarnaalat)

493 notes

popculturehypnotizedmycat:

Global NewsMarvel Comics is bringing Ms. Marvel back as a 16-year-old daughter of Pakistani immigrants living in Jersey City named Kamala Khan.

The character — among the first to be a series protagonist who is both a woman and Muslim — is part of Marvel Entertainment’s efforts to reflect a growing diversity among its readers while keeping ahold of the contemporary relevance that have underlined its foundation since the creation of Spider-Man and the X-Men in the early 1960s.

Writer G. Willow Wilson and artist Adrian Alphona, working with editor Sana Amanat, say the series reflects Khan’s vibrant but kinetic world, learning to deal with superpowers, family expectations and adolescence.

Amanat calls the series a “desire to explore the Muslim-American diaspora from an authentic perspective” and what it means to be young and lost amid expectations by others while also telling the story of a teenager coming to grips with having amazing powers.

I wanted Ms. Marvel to be true-to-life, something real people could relate to, particularly young women. High school was a very vivid time in my life, so I drew heavily on those experiences – impending adulthood, dealing with school, emotionally charged friendships that are such a huge part of being a teenager,” said Willow, whose previous comics work includes Vertigo’s “Cairo” and the series “Air.”

“It’s for all the geek girls out there and everybody else who’s ever looked at life from the fringe.”

(Source: canadianbeerandpostmodernism, via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

3,920 notes

wocinsolidarity:

jaladiya:

notable south asian americans → Kalpana Chawla

Kalpana Chawla is the 1st Indian American astronaut and 1st Indian woman in space.

Born in Karnal, India, on July 1, 1961, Chawla was the youngest of four children. 

Chawla obtained a degree in aeronautical engineering from Punjab Engineering College before immigrating to the United States and becoming a naturalized citizen in the 1980s. She earned a doctorate in aerospace engineering from the University of Colorado in 1988, having previously obtained her masters degree from the University of Texas. She began working at NASA’s Ames Research Center the same year, working on power-lift computational fluid dynamics.

In 1994, Chawla was selected as an astronaut candidate. After a year of training, she became a crew representative for the Astronaut Office EVA/Robotics and Computer Branches, where she worked with Robotic Situational Awareness Displays and tested software for the space shuttles.

Chawla’s first opportunity to fly in space came in November 1997, aboard the space shuttle Columbia on flight STS-87.

In 2000, Chawla was selected for her second voyage into space, serving again as a mission specialist on STS-107 in the Columbia space shuttle. The mission was delayed several times, and finally launched in 2003. Over the course of the 16-day flight, the crew completed more than 80 experiments.

Chawla and the 6 other crew members died on February 1, 2003 while Columbia was attempting to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere.

Over the course of her two missions, Chawla logged 30 days, 14 hours, and 54 minutes in space. After her first launch, she said, "When you look at the stars and the galaxy, you feel that you are not just from any particular piece of land, but from the solar system.”

(via Nola Taylor Redd)

OMG BROWN GIRLS IN SPACE YESYES

(via sparkamovement)

82,655 notes

angrywomenofcolorunited:

Today Google celebrates Shakuntala Devi’s 84th birthday.  She was popularly known as the “Human Computer”, was a child prodigy, and mental calculator. She passed away on April 21 2013, she was 83 years old. Her achievements include:

  • In 1977 in the USA she competed with a computer to see who could calculate the cube root of 188,132,517 faster (she won). That same year, at the Southern Methodist University she was asked to give the 23rd root of a 201-digit number; she answered in 50 seconds. Her answer—546,372,891—was confirmed by calculations done at the U.S. Bureau of Standards by the Univac 1101 computer, for which a special program had to be written to perform such a large calculation.
  • On June 18, 1980, she demonstrated the multiplication of two 13-digit numbers 7,686,369,774,870 × 2,465,099,745,779 picked at random by the Computer Department of Imperial College, London. She correctly answered 18,947,668,177,995,426,462,773,730 in 28 seconds. This event is mentioned in the 1982 Guinness Book of Records.

Happy birthday Shakuntala!

(via officialprincessjasmine)